Portable drives and Working remotely in Today’s IT Infrastructure

So, Wikileaks announced this week that its next release will be 7 times as large as the Iraq logs. The initial release brought a very common problem that organizations of all sizes face to the top of the global stage – anyone with a USB drive or writeable CD drive can download confidential information, and walk right out the door. The reverse is true, and harmful malware, Trojans, and viruses can be placed onto the network, as seen with the Stuxnet virus. These pesky little portable media drives are more trouble than they are worth! OK, you’re right, let’s not cry “The sky is falling” just yet.

But, the Wikileaks and Stuxnet virus aside, how big is this threat?

  • A 2009 a study revealed that 59% of former employees stole data from their employers prior to leaving learn more
  • A new study in the UK reveals USB sticks (23%) and other portable storage devices (19%) are the most common devices for insider theft learn more

Right now, there are two primary schools of thought to this significant problem. The first is to take an alarmist approach, and disable all drives, so that no one can steal this data, or infect the network. The other approach is to turn a blind eye, and have no controls in place.

But how does one know who is doing what, and which files are being downloaded or uploaded? The answer is in your device and application logs, of course. The first step is to define your organization’s security policy concerning USB and readable CD drives:

1. Define the capabilities for each individual user as tied to their system login

  • Servers and folders they have permission to access
  • Allow/disallow USB and writeable CD drives
  • Create a record of the serial numbers of the CD drive and USB drive

2. Monitor log activity for USB drives and writeable CD drives to determine what information may have been taken, and by whom

Obviously, this is like closing the barn door after the horse has left. You will be able to know who did what, and when… but by then it may be too late to prevent any financial loss or harm to your customers.

The ideal solution is to support this organization-wide policy that defines the abilities of each individual user, and determine who has permission to use the writeable capabilities of the CD drive or USB drive at the workstation, while monitoring and controlling serial numbers and information access from the server level with automation… combing through all of the logs to look for this event, and being able to trace what happened would seem almost impossible.

With a SIEM/log management solution, this process can be automated, and your organization can be alerted to any event that occurs where the transfer of data does not match the user profile/serial number combination. It is even possible to prevent that data from being transferred by automatically disabling the device. In other words, if someone with a sales ID attempts to copy a file from the accounting server onto a USB drive where the serial number does not match their profile, you can have the drive automatically disabled and issue an incident to investigate this activity. By the same token, if someone with the right user profile/serial number combination copies a file they are permitted to access – something that is a normal, everyday event in conducting business – they would be allowed to do so.

This solution prevents many headaches, and will prevent your confidential data from making the headlines of the Los Angeles Times or the Washington Post.

To learn how EventTracker can actually automate this security initiative for you, click here 

-John Sennott

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