Personalization wins the day

Despite tough times for the corporate world in the past year, spending on IT security was a bright spot in an otherwise gloomy picture.

However if you’ve tried to convince a CFO to sign off on tools and software, you know just how difficult this can be. In fact, the most common way to get approval is to tie this request to an unrelenting compliance mandate. Sadly, a security incident can also help focus and trigger the approval of budget.

Vendors have tried hard to showcase their value by appealing to the preventive nature of their products. ROI calculations are usually provided to demonstrate quick payback but these are often dismissed by the CFO as self serving. Recognizing the difficulty of measuring ROI, an alternate model called ROSI has been proposed but has met with limited success.

So what is an effective way to educate and persuade the gnomes? Try an approach from a parallel field, presentation of medical data. Your medical chart: it’s hard to access, impossible to read — and full of information that could make you healthier if you just knew how to use it, pretty much like security information inside the enterprise. But if you have seen lab results, even motivated persons find it hard to decipher and take action, much less the disinclined.

In a recent talk at TED, Thomas Goetz, the executive editor of Wired magazine addressed this issue and proposed some simple ideas to make this data meaningful and actionable. The use of color, graphics and most important personalization of the information to drive action. We know from experience that posting the speed limit is less effective at getting motorists to comply as compared to a radar gun which posts the speed limit and framed by “Your speed is __”. Its all about personalization.

To make security information meaningful to the CFO, a similar approach can be much more effective than bland “best practice” prescriptions or questionable ROI numbers. Gather data from your enterprise and present it with color and graphs tailored to the “patient”.

Personalize your presentation; get a more patient ear and much less resistance to your budget request.

A. N. Ananth

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