Top 5 Compliance Mistakes

5.   Overdoing compensating controls

When a legitimate technological or documented business constraint prevents you from satisfying a requirement, a compensating control can be the answer after a risk analysis is performed. Compensating controls are not specifically defined inside PCI, but are instead defined by you (as a self-certifying merchant) or your QSA. It is specifically not an excuse to push PCI Compliance initiatives through completion at a minimal cost to your company. In reality, most compensating controls are actually harder to do and cost more money in the long run than actually fixing or addressing the original issue or vulnerability. See this article for a clear picture on the topic.

4. Separation of duty

Separation of duties is a key concept of internal controls. Increased protection from fraud and errors must be balanced with the increased cost/effort required.   Both PCI DSS Requirements 3.4.1 and 3.5 mention separation of duties as an obligation for organizations, and yet many still do not do it right, usually because they lack staff.

3. Principle of Least privilege

PCI 2.2.3 says they should “configure system security parameters to prevent misuse.” This requires organizations to drill down into user roles to ensure they’re following the rule of least privilege wherever PCI regulations apply.   This is easier said than done; more often it’s “easier” to grant all possible privileges rather than determine and assign just the correct set. Convenience is the enemy of security.

2. Fixating on excluding systems from scope

When you make the process of getting things out of scope a higher priority than addressing real risk, you get in trouble. Risk mitigation must come first and foremost. In far too many cases, out-of-scope becomes out-of-mind. This may make your CFO happy, but a hacker will get past weak security and not care if the system is in scope or not.

And drum roll …

1. Ignoring virtualization

Many organizations have embraced virtualization wholeheartedly given its efficiency gains. In some cases, virtualized machines are now off-premises and co-located at a service provider like Rackspace. This is a trend at federal government facilities.   However, “off-premises” does not mean “off-your-list”. Regardless of the location of the cardholder data, such systems are within scope as are the hypervisor. In fact, PCI DSS 2.0 says, if the cardholder data is present on even one VM, then the entire VM infrastructure is “in scope.”

 

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