Learning from JPMorgan

The single most revealing moment in the coverage of JPMorgan’s multibillion dollar debacle can be found in this take-your-breath-away passage from The Wall Street Journal: On April 30, associates who were gathered in a conference room handed Mr. Dimon summaries and analyses of the losses. But there were no details about the trades themselves. “I want to see the positions!” he barked, throwing down the papers, according to attendees. “Now! I want to see everything!”

When Mr. Dimon saw the numbers, these people say, he couldn’t breathe.

Only when he saw the actual trades — the raw data — did Mr. Dimon realize the full magnitude of his company’s situation. The horrible irony: The very detail-oriented systems (and people) Dimon had put in place had obscured rather than surfaced his bank’s horrible hedge.

This underscores the new trust versus due diligence dilemma outlined by Michael Schrage. Raw data can have enormous impact on executive perceptions that pre-chewed analytics lack.   This is not to minimize or marginalize the importance of analysis and interpretation; but nothing creates situational awareness faster than seeing with your own eyes what your experts are trying to synthesize and summarize.

There’s a reason why great chefs visit the farms and markets that source their restaurants:   the raw ingredients are critical to success — or failure.

We have spent a lot of energy in building dashboards for critical log data and recognize the value of these summaries; but while we should trust our data, we also need to do the due diligence.

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