Are you a Data Scientist?

The advent of the big data era means that analyzing large, messy, unstructured data will increasingly form part of everyone’s work. Managers and business analysts will often be called upon to conduct data-driven experiments, to interpret data, and to create innovative data-based products and services. To thrive in this world, many will require additional skills. In a new Avanade survey, more than 60 percent of respondents said their employees need to develop new skills to translate big data into insights and business value.

Are you:

Ready and willing to experiment with your log and SIEM data? Managers and security analysts must be able to apply the principles of scientific experimentation to their log and SIEM data. They must know how to construct intelligent hypotheses. They also need to understand the principles of experimental testing and design, including population selection and sampling, in order to evaluate the validity of data analyses. As randomized testing and experimentation become more commonplace, a background in scientific experimental design will be particularly valued.

Adept at mathematical reasoning? How many of your IT staff today are really “numerate” — competent in the interpretation and use of numeric data? It’s a skill that’s going to become increasingly critical. IT Staff members don’t need to be statisticians, but they need to understand the proper usage of statistical methods. They should understand how to interpret data, metrics and the results of statistical models.

Able to see the big (data) picture? You might call this “data literacy,” or competence in finding, manipulating, managing, and interpreting data, including not just numbers but also text and images. Data literacy skills should be widespread within the IT function, and become an integral aspect of every function and activity.

Jeanne Harris blogging in the Harvard Business Review writes, “Tomorrow’s leaders need to ensure that their people have these skills, along with the culture, support and accountability to go with it. In addition, they must be comfortable leading organizations in which many employees, not just a handful of IT professionals and PhDs in statistics, are up to their necks in the complexities of analyzing large, unstructured and messy data.

“Ensuring that big data creates big value calls for a reskilling effort that is at least as much about fostering a data-driven mindset and analytical culture as it is about adopting new technology. Companies leading the revolution already have an experiment-focused, numerate, data-literate workforce.”

If this presents a challenge, then co-sourcing the function may be an option. The EventTracker Control Center here at Prism offers SIEM Simplified, a service where trained and expert IT staff perform the heavy lifting associated with big data analysis, as it relates to SIEM data. By removing the outliers and bringing patterns to your attention at greater efficiencies because of scale, focus and expertise, you can focus on the interpretation and associated actions.