Five telltale signs that your data security is failing and what you can do about it

5 telltale signs that your data security is failing and what you can do about it:

1) Security controls are not proportional to the business value of data

Protecting every bit of data as if it’s a gold bullion in Ft. Knox is not practical. Controls complexity (and therefore cost) must be proportional to the value of the items under protection. Loose change belongs on the bedside table; the crown jewels belong in the Tower of London. If you haven’t classified your data to know which is which, then the business stakeholders have no incentive to be involved in its protection.

2) Gaps between data owners and the security team

Data owners usually only understand business processes and activities and the related information – not the “data”. Security teams, on the other hand, understand “data” but usually not its relation to the business, and therefore its criticality to the enterprise. Each needs to take a half step into the others’ domain.

3) The company has never been penalized

Far too often, toothless regulation encourages a wait-and-see approach. Show me an organization that has failed an audit and I’ll show you one that is now motivated to make investments in security.

4) Stakeholders only see value in sharing, not the risk of leakage

Data owners get upset and push back against involving security teams in the setup of access management. Open access encourages sharing and improves productivity, they say. It’s my data, why are you placing obstacles in its usage? Can your security team effectively communicate the risk of leakage in terms that the data owner can understand?

5) Security is viewed as a hurdle to be overcome

How large is the gap between the business leaders and the security team?  The farther apart they are, the harder it is to get support for security initiatives. It helps to have a champion, but over-dependence on a single person is not sustainable. You need buy-in from senior leadership.