The Intelligence Industrial Complex

If you are old enough to remember the 1988 election in the USA for President, then the name Gary Hart may sound familiar. He was the clear frontrunner after his second Senate term from Colorado was over. He was caught in an extra-marital affair and dropped out of the race. He has since earned a doctorate in politics from Oxford and accepted an endowed professorship at the University of Colorado at Denver.

In this analysis, he quotes President Dwight Eisenhower, “…we must guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought, by the military-industrial complex. The potential for the disastrous rise of misplaced power exists, and will persist.”

His point is that the US now has an intelligence-industrial complex composed of close to a dozen and a half federal intelligence agencies and services, many of which are duplicative, and in the last decade or two the growth of a private sector intelligence world. It is dangerous to have a technology-empowered government capable of amassing private data; it is even more dangerous to privatize this Big Brother world.

As has been extensively reported recently, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) courts are required to issue warrants, as the Fourth Amendment  (against unreasonable search and seizure) requires, upon a showing that the national security is endangered. This was instituted in the early 1970s following the findings of serious unconstitutional abuse of power. He asks “Is the Surveillance State — the intelligence-industrial complex — out of the control of the elected officials responsible for holding it accountable to American citizens protected by the U.S. Constitution?

We should not have to rely on whistle-blowers to protect our rights.

In a recent interview with Charlie Rose of PBS, President Obama said, “My concern has always been not that we shouldn’t do intelligence gathering to prevent terrorism, but rather: Are we setting up a system of checks and balances?” Despite this he avoided answering how no request to a FISA court has ever been rejected, that companies that provide data on their customers are under a gag order that even prevents them for disclosing the requests.

Is the Intelligence-Industrial complex calling the shots? Does the President know a lot more than he can reveal? Clearly he is unwilling to even consider changing his predecessor policy.

It would seem that Senator Hart has a valid point. If so, its a lot more consequential than Monkey Business.

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