Digital detox: Learning from Luke Skywalker

For any working professional in 2013, multiple screens, devices and apps are integral instruments for success. The multitasking can be overwhelming and dependence on gadgets and Internet connectivity can become a full-blown addiction.

There are digital detox facilities for those whose careers and relationships have been ruined by extreme gadget use. Shambhalah Ranch in Northern California has a three-day retreat for people who feel addicted to their gadgets. For 72 hours, the participants eat vegan food, practice yoga, swim in a nearby creek, take long walks in the woods, and keep a journal about being offline. Participants have one thing in common: they’re driven to distraction by the Internet.

Is this you? Checking e-mail in the bathroom and sleeping with your cell phone by your bed are now considered normal. According to the Pew Research Center, in 2007 only 58 percent of people used their phones to text; last year it was 80 percent. More than half of all cell phone users have smartphones, giving them Internet access all the time. As a result, the number of hours Americans spend collectively online has almost doubled since 2010, according to ComScore, a digital analytics company.

Teens and twentysomethings are the most wired. In 2011, Diana Rehling and Wendy Bjorklund, communications professors at St. Cloud State University in Minnesota, surveyed their undergraduates and found that the average college student checks Facebook 20 times an hour.

So what can Luke Skywalker teach you? Shane O’Neill says it well:

“The climactic Death Star battle scene is the centerpiece of the movie’s nature vs. technology motif, a reminder to today’s viewers about the perils of relying too much on gadgets and not enough on human intuition. You’ll recall that Luke and his team of X-Wing fighters are attacking Darth Vader’s planet-size command center. Pilots are relying on a navigation and targeting system displayed through a small screen (using gloriously outdated computer graphics) to try to drop torpedoes into the belly of the Death Star. No pilot has succeeded, and a few have been blown to bits.

“Luke, an apprentice still learning the ways of The Force from the wise — but now dead — Obi-Wan Kenobi, decides to put The Force to work in the heat of battle. He pushes the navigation screen away from his face, shuts off his “targeting computer” and lets The Force guide his mind and his jet’s torpedo to the precise target.

“Luke put down his gadget, blocked out the noise and found a quiet place of Zen-like focus. George Lucas was making an anti-technology statement 36 years ago that resonates today. The overarching message of Star Wars is to use technology for good. Use it to conquer evil, but don’t let it override your own human Force. Don’t let technology replace you.

Take a lesson from a great Jedi warrior. Push the screen away from time to time and give your mind and personality a chance to shine. When it’s time to use the screen again, use it for good.”

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