Hackers: What they are looking for and the abnormal activities you should be evaluating

Most hackers are looking into critical data for credential theft. A credential theft attack is when an attacker initially gains privileged access to a computer on a network and then uses freely available tooling to extract credentials from the sessions of other logged-on accounts. The most prevalent target for a credential theft is a “VIP account.” VIP account’s consist of contacts with highly sensitive data attached: access to accounts and secure data that many others within that organization probably don’t have.

It’s very important for administrators to be conscious of activities that increase the likelihood of a successful credential-theft attack.

These activities are:
• Logging on to unsecured computers with privileged accounts
• Browsing the Internet with a highly privileged account
• Configuring local privileged accounts with the same credentials across systems
• Overpopulation and overuse of privileged domain groups
• Insufficient management of the security of domain controllers.

There are specific accounts, servers, and infrastructure components that are the usual primary targets of attacks against Active Directory.

These accounts are:
• Permanently privileged accounts
• VIP accounts
• “Privilege-Attached” Active Directory accounts
• Domain controllers
• Other infrastructure services that affect identity, access, and configuration management, such as public key infrastructure (PKI) servers and systems management servers

Although pass-the-hash (PtH) and other credential theft attacks are ubiquitous today, it is because there is freely available tooling that makes it simple and easy to extract the credentials of other privileged accounts when an attacker has gained Administrator – or SYSTEM-level access to a computer.

Even without this tool, an attacker with privileged access to a computer can just as easily install keystroke loggers that capture keystrokes, screenshots, and clipboard contents. An attacker with privileged access to a computer can disable anti-malware software, install rootkits, modify protected files, or install malware on the computer that automates attacks or turns a server into a drive-by download host.

The tactics used to extend a breach beyond a single computer vary, but the key to propagating compromise is the acquisition of highly privileged access to additional systems. By reducing the number of accounts with privileged access to any system, you reduce the attack surface not only of that computer, but the likelihood of an attacker harvesting valuable credentials from the computer.

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