Threat Intelligence vs Privacy

On Jan 13, 2015, the U.S. White House published a set of legislative proposals on cyber security threat intelligence (TI) sharing between private and public entities. Given the breadth of cyber attacks across the Internet, the sharing of information between commercial entities and the US Government is increasingly critical. Absent sharing, first responders charged with cyber defense are at a disadvantage in detecting and responding to common attacks.

Should this cause a privacy concern?
Richard Bejtlich, senior fellow at Brookings says “Threat intelligence does not contain personal information of American citizens, and privacy can be maintained while learning about threats. Intelligence should be published in an automated, machine-consumable, standardized manner.”

The White House proposal uses the following definition:
“The term `cyber threat indicator’ means information —
(A) that is necessary to indicate, describe or identify–
(i) malicious reconnaissance, including communications that reasonably appear to be transmitted for the purpose of gathering technical information related to a cyber threat;
(ii) a method of defeating a technical or operational control;
(iii) a technical vulnerability;
(iv) a method of causing a user with legitimate access to an information system or information that is stored on, processed by, or transiting an information system inadvertently to enable the defeat of a technical control or an operational control;
(v) malicious cyber command and control;
(vi) any combination of (i)-(v).
(B) from which reasonable efforts have been made to remove information that can be used to identify specific persons reasonably believed to be unrelated to the cyber threat.”

If you take the above at face value, then a reasonable assumption is that these sorts of cyber threat indicators should not trigger privacy concerns, whether shared between the private sector and the government or within the private sector.

Of course, getting TI and using it effectively are completely different as discussed here. Bejtlich reminds us that “private sector organizations should focus first on improving their own defenses before expecting that government assistance will mitigate their security problems.”

Looking for an practical, cost effective way to shore up your defenses? SIEM Simplified is one way to go about it.

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