PCI-DSS 3.1 is here – what now?

On April 15, 2015, the PCI Security Standards Council (PCI SSC) announced the release of PCI DSS v3.1. This follows closely on the heels of PCI DSS 3.0, that just went into full effect on January 1, 2015. There is a three-year cycle between major updates of PCI DSS and, outside of that cycle, the standard can be updated to react to threats as needed.

The major driver of PCI DSS 3.1 is the industry’s conclusion that SSL version 3.0 is no longer a secure protocol and therefore must be addressed by the PCI DSS.

What happened to SSL?
The last-released version of encryption protocol to be called “SSL”—version 3.0—was superseded by “TLS,” or Transport Layer Security, in 1999. While weaknesses were identified in SSL 3.0 at that time, it was still considered safe for use up until October of 2014, when the POODLE vulnerability  came to light. POODLE is a flaw in the SSL 3.0 protocol itself, so it’s not something that can be fixed with a software patch.

Bottom line
Any business software running SSL 2.0 or 3.0 must be reconfigured or upgraded.
Note: Most SSL/TLS deployments support both SSL 3.0 and TLS 1.0 in their default configuration. Newer software may support SSL 3.0, TLS 1.0, TLS 1.1 and TLS 1.2. In these cases the software simply needs to be reconfigured. Older software may only support SSL 2.0 and SSL 3.0 (if this is the case, it is time to upgrade).

How to detect SSL/TLS usage and version?
A vulnerability scan from EventTracker Vulnerability Assessment Service (ETVAS) or other scanner, will identify insecure implementations.

SSL/TLS is a widely deployed encryption protocol. The most common use of SSL/TLS is to secure websites (HTTPS), though it is also used to:
• Secure email in transit (SMTPS or SMTP with STARTTLS, IMAPS or IMAP with STARTTLS)
• Share files (FTPS)
• Secure connections to remote databases and secure remote network logins (SSL VPN)
SIEM Simplified customers
The EventTracker Control Center will have contacted you to correctly configure the Windows server instance hosting the EventTracker Manager Console, to comply with the guideline. You must upgrade or reconfigure all other vulnerable servers in your network.

If you subscribe to ETVAS, the latest vulnerability reports will highlight any servers that must be reconfigured along with detailed recommendations on how to do so.

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