The PCI-DSS Compliance Report

A key element of the PCI-DSS standard is Requirement 10: Track and monitor all access to network resources and cardholder data. Logging mechanisms and the ability to track user activities are critical in preventing, detecting and minimizing the impact of a data compromise. The presence of logs in all environments allows thorough tracking, alerting and analysis when something does go wrong. Determining the cause of a compromise is very difficult, if not impossible, without system activity logs.

However the 2014 Verizon PCI Report is billed as an inside look at the business need for protecting payment card information says: “Only 9.4% of organizations that our RISK team investigated after a data breach was reported were compliant with Requirement 10. By comparison, our QSAs found 31.7% compliance with Requirement 10. This suggests a correlation between the lack of effective log management and the likelihood of suffering a security breach.”

Here is a side benefit of paying attention to compliance: Consistent and complete audit trails can also significantly reduce the cost of a breach. A large part of post-compromise cost is related to the number of cards thought to be exposed. Lack of conclusive log information reduces the forensic investigator’s ability to determine whether the card data in the environment was exposed only partially or in full.

In other words, when (not if) you detect the breach, having good audit records will reduce the cost of the breach.

Organizations can’t prevent or address a breach unless they can detect it. Active monitoring of the logs from their cardholder data environments enables organizations to spot and respond to suspected data breaches much more quickly.

Organizations generally find enterprise log management hard, in terms of generating logs (covered in controls 10.1 and 10.2), protecting them (10.5), reviewing them (10.6), and archiving them (10.7).

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