The fallacy of “protect critical systems”

Risk management 101 says you can’t possibly apply the same safeguards to all systems in the network. Therefore, you must classify your assets and apply greater protection to the “critical” systems—the ones where you have more to lose in the event of a breach. And so, desktops are considered less critical as compared to servers, where the crown jewels are housed.

But think about this: an attacker will most likely probe for the weakly defended spot, and thus many widespread breaches originate at the desktop. In fact, in many cases, attackers discover crown jewels are sometimes also available at some workstations of key employees (e.g., the CEO’s assistant?), in which case there is not even a need to attack a hardened server.

So while it still makes sense to mount better defenses of critical systems, it’s equally sensible to be able to investigate compromised systems, regardless of their criticality. To do so, you must be gathering telemetry from all systems. While you may not be able to do this if you are allowing a BYOD policy, you should definitely think about data gathering from beyond just “critical systems.”

The ETDR functionality built in to the EventTracker 8 sensor (formerly agent) for Windows lets you collect this telemetry easily and efficiently. The argument here being it’s very worthwhile given the current threat landscape, to cover not just critical systems, but also desktops, with this technology.

What’s new in EventTracker 8? Find out here.