Hallmarks of a successful security monitoring team

Over the years, we have seen many approaches to implementing a security monitoring capability.

The “checkbox mentality” is common—when the team uses the out-of-the-box functionality, including perhaps rules/reports, to meet a specific regulation.

The “big hero” approach is found in chaotic environments where tools are implemented with no planning or oversight, in a very “just do it” approach. The results may be fine, but are lost when the “big hero” moves on or loses interest.

The “strict process” organizations that implement a waterfall model and have rigid processes for change management and the like frequently lack the agility and dynamics required by today’s constantly evolving threats.

So what then are the hallmarks of a successful approach? Augusto Barrios described these factors here. Three factors are common:

  • Good people: Team members who know the environment and can create good use cases. Members who know the selected technology and can weave the rules, configuration and customize to suit.
  • Lightweight, but clear processes: Recognize that it’s very hard to move from good ideas to real (and deployed) use cases without processes. Absent this, things go to a slow death.
  • Top down and lateral support: The security team may have good people and processes to put together the use cases, but they are not an island. They will need continuous support to bring in new log sources, context data and the knowledge about the business and the environment required for implementation and optimization. They will need other people’s (IT ops, business applications specialists) time and commitment, and that’s only possible with top down support and empowerment.

Since it’s quite hard to get all of it right, an increasingly popular approach is to split the problem between the SIEM vendor and the buyer. Each has strengths critical to success. The SIEM vendor is expert with the technology, likely has well defined processes for implementation and operational success, whereas the buyer knows the environment intimately. Together, good use cases can be crafted. Escalation from the SIEM vendor who performs the monitoring is passed to the buyer team to provide lateral support. This approach has the potential to ramp up very quickly, since each team plays to their existing strengths.

The Gartner term for this approach is “co-managed SIEM.”

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