Archive

100 Log Management uses #59 – 6 items to monitor on workstations


In part 2 of our series on workstation monitoring we look at the 6 things that are in your best interest to monitor — the types of things that if you proactively monitor will save you money by preventing operational and security problems. I would be very interested if any of you monitor other things that you feel would be more valuable. Hope you enjoy it.

100 Log Management uses #58 The why, how and what of monitoring logs on workstations


Today we are going to start a short series on the value of monitoring logs on Windows workstations. It is commonly agreed to that log monitoring on servers is a best practice, but until recently the complexity and expense of log management on workstations made most people shy away, but log monitoring on the workstation is valuable, and easy as well, if you know what to look for. These next 3 blogs will tell you the why, how and what.

SQL injection leaves databases exposed; zero-day flaw responsible for Google hack


Turning log information into business intelligence with relationship mapping Now that we’re past January, most of us have received all of our W2 and 1099 tax forms. We all know that it’s important to keep these forms until we’ve filed our taxes and most of us also keep the forms for seven years after filing in case there is a problem with a previous year’s filing. But how many of us keep those records past the seven year mark? Keeping too much data can be as problematic as not keeping records at all. One of the biggest problems with retention of too much information is that storage needs increase and it becomes difficult to parse through the existing data to find what’s most important.

Sustainable vs. Situational Values


I am often asked that if Log Management is so important to the modern IT department, then how come more than 80% of the market that “should” have adopted it has not done so?

The cynic says “unless you have best practice as an enforced regulation (think PCI-DSS here)” then twill always be thus.

One reason why I think this is so is because earlier generations never had power tools and found looking at logs to be hard and relatively unrewarding work. That perception is hard to overcome even in this day and age after endless punditry and episode after episode has clarified the value.

Still resisting the value proposition? Then consider a recent column in the NY Times which quotes Dov Seidman, the C.E.O. of LRN who describes two kinds of values: “situational values” and “sustainable values.”

The article is in the context of the current political situation in the US but the same theme applies to many other areas.

“Leaders, companies or individuals guided by situational values do whatever the situation will allow, no matter the wider interests of their communities. For example, a banker who writes a mortgage for someone he knows can’t make the payments over time is acting on situational values, saying: I’ll be gone when the bill comes due.”

At the other end, people inspired by sustainable values act just the opposite, saying: I will never be gone. “I will always be here. Therefore, I must behave in ways that sustain — my employees, my customers, my suppliers, my environment, my country and my future generations.”

We accept that your datacenter grew organically, that back-in-the-day there were no power tools and you dug ditches with your bare hands outside when it was 40 below and tweets were for the birds…but…that was then and this is now.

Get Log Management, it’s a sustainable value.

Ananth