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Will the cloud take my job?


Nearly every analyst has made aggressive predictions that outsourcing to the cloud will continue to grow rapidly. It’s clear that servers and applications are migrating to the cloud as fast as possible, but according to an article in The Economist, the tradeoff is efficiency vs. sovereignty.   The White House announced that the federal government will shut down 178 duplicative data centers in 2012, adding to the 195 that will be closed by the end of this year.

Businesses need motivation and capability to recognize business problems, solutions that can improve the enterprise, and ways to implement those solutions.   There is clearly a role for outsourced solutions and it is one that enterprises are embracing.

For an engineer, however, the response to outsourcing can be one of frustration, and concerns about short-sighted decisions by management that focus on short term gains at the risk of long term security. But there is also an argument why in-sourcing isn’t necessarily the better business decision:   a recent Gartner report noted that IT departments often center too much of their attention on technology and not enough on business needs, resulting in a “veritable Tower of Babel, where the language between the IT organization and the business has been confounded, and they no longer understand each other.”

Despite increased migration to cloud services, it does not appear that there is an immediate impact on InfoSec-related jobs.   Among the 12 computer-related job classifications tracked by the Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), information security analysts, along with computer and information research scientists, were among those whose jobs did not report unemployment during the first two quarters of 2011.

John Reed, executive director at IT staffing firm Robert Half Technology, attributes the high growth to the increasing organizational awareness of the need for security and hands-on IT security teams to ensure appropriate security controls are in place to safeguard digital files and vital electronic infrastructure, as well as respond to computer security breaches and viruses.

Simply put: the facility of using cloud services does not replace the skills needed to analyze and interpret the data to protect the enterprise.   Outsourcing to a cloud may provide immediate efficiencies, but it’s   the IT security staff who deliver business value that ensure long term security.

Threatscape 2012 – Prevent, Detect, Correct


The past year has been a hair-raising series of IT security breakdowns and headlining events reaching as high as RSA itself falling victim to a phishing attack.   But as the year set on 2011, the hacker group Anonymous remained busy, providing a sobering reminder that IT Security can never rest.

It turned out that attackers sent two different targeted phishing e-mails to four workers at its parent company, EMC.   The e-mails contained a malicious attachment that was identified in the subject line as “2011 Recruitment plan.xls” which was the point of attack.

Back to Basics:

Prevent:

Using administrative controls such as security awareness training, technical controls such as firewalls, and anti-virus and IPS, to stop attacks from penetrating the network.   Most industry and government experts agree that security configuration management is probably the best way to ensure the best security configuration allowable, along with automated patch management and updating anti-virus software.

Detect:

Employing a blend of technical controls such as anti-virus, IPS, intrusion detection systems (IDS), system monitoring, file integrity monitoring, change control, log management and incident alerting   can help to track how and when system intrusions are being attempted.

Correct:

Applying operating system upgrades, backup data restore and vulnerability mitigation and other controls to make sure systems are configured correctly and can prevent the irretrievable loss of data.

IT Trends and Comments for 2012


The beginning of a new year marks a time of reflection on the past and anticipation of the future. The result for analysts, pundits and authors is a near irresistible urge to identify important trends in their areas of expertise (real or imagined). I am no exception, so here are my thoughts on what we’ll see in the next year in the areas of application and evolution of Information Technology.

Echo Chamber


In the InfoSec industry, there is an abundance of familiar flaws and copycat theories and approaches. We repeat ourselves and recommend the same approaches. But what has really changed in the last year?

The emergence of hacking groups like Anonymous, LulzSec, and TeaMp0isoN.

In 2011, these groups brought the fight to corporate America, crippling firms both small (HBGary Federal) and large (Stratfor, Sony). As the year drew to a close these groups shifted from prank-oriented hacks for laughs (or “lulz”), to aligning themselves with political movements like Occupy Wall Street, and hacking firms like Stratfor, a Austin, Tex.-based security “think tank” that releases a daily newsletter concerning security and intelligence matters all over the world. After HBGary Federal CEO Aaron Barr publicly bragged that he was going to identify some members of the group during a talk in San Francisco at the RSA Conference week, Anonymous members responded by dumping a huge cache of his personal emails and those of other HBGary Federal executives online, eventually leading to Barr’s resignation. Anonymous and LulzSec then spent several months targeting various retailers, public figures and members of the security community. Their Operation AntiSec aimed to expose alleged hypocrisies and sins by members of the security community. They targeted a number of federal contractors, including IRC Federal and Booz Allen Hamilton, exposing personal data in the process. Congress got involved in July when Sen. John McCain urged Senate leaders to form a select committee to address the threat posed by Anonymous/LulzSec/Wikileaks.

The attack on RSA SecurId was another watershed event. The first public news of the compromise came from RSA itself, when it published a blog post explaining that an attacker had been able to gain access to the company’s network through a “sophisticated” attack. Officials said the attacker had compromised some resources related to the RSA SecurID product, which set off major alarm bells throughout the industry. SecurID is used for two-factor authentication by a huge number of large enterprises, including banks, financial services companies, government agencies and defense contractors. Within months of the RSA attack, there were attacks on SecurID customers, including Lockheed Martin, and the current working theory espoused by experts is that the still-unidentified attackers were interested in LM and other RSA customers all along and, having run into trouble compromising them directly, went after the SecurID technology to loop back to the customers.

The specifics of the attack were depressingly mundane (targeted phishing email with a malicious Excel file attached).

Then too, several certificate authorities were compromised throughout the year. Comodo was the first to fall when it was revealed in March that an attacker (apparently an Iranian national) had been able to compromise the CA infrastructure and issue himself a pile of valid certificates for domains belonging to Google, Yahoo, Skype and others. The attacker bragged about his accomplishments in Pastebin posts and later posted evidence of his forged certificate for Mozilla. Later in the year, the same person targeted the Dutch CA DigiNotar. The details of the attack were slightly different, but the end result was the same: he was able to issue himself several hundred valid certificates and this time went after domains owned by, among others, the Central Intelligence Agency. In the end, all of the major browser manufacturers had to revoke trust in the DigiNotar root CA.   The damage to the company was so bad that the Dutch government eventually took it over and later declared it bankrupt. Staggering, isn’t it? A lone attacker not only forced Microsoft, Apple and Mozilla to yank a root CA from their list of trusted roots, but he was also responsible for forcing a certificate authority out of business.

What has changed in our industry? Nothing really. It’s not a question “if” but “when” the attack will arrive on your assets.

Plus ça change, plus c'est la même, I suppose.

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