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Did Big Data destroy the U.S. healthcare system?


The problem-plagued rollout of healthcare.gov has dominated the news in the USA. Proponents of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) urge that teething problems are inevitable and that’s all these are. In fact, President Obama has been at pains to say the ACA is more than just a website. Opponents of the law see the website failures as one more indicator that it is unworkable.

The premise of the ACA is that young healthy persons will sign up in large numbers and help defray the costs expected from older persons and thus provide a good deal for all. It has also been argued that the ACA is a good deal for young healthies. The debate between proponents of the ACA and the opponents of ACA hinge around this point. See for example, the debate (shouting match?) between Dr. Zeke Emmanuel and James Capretta on Fox News Sunday. In this segment, Capretta says the free market will solve the problem (but it hasn’t so far, has it?) and so Emmanuel says it must be mandated.

So when then has the free market not solved the problem? Robert X. Cringely argues that big data is the culprit. Here’s his argument:

– In the years before Big Data was available, actuaries at insurance companies studied morbidity and mortality statistics in order to set insurance rates. This involved metadata — data about data — because for the most part the actuaries weren’t able to drill down far enough to reach past broad groups of policyholders to individuals. In that system, insurance company profitability increased linearly with scale, so health insurance companies wanted as many policyholders as possible, making a profit on most of them.

– Enter Big Data. The cost of computing came down to the point where it was cost-effective to calculate likely health outcomes on an individual basis.

– Result? The health insurance business model switched from covering as many people as possible to covering as few people as possible — selling insurance only to healthy people who didn’t much need the healthcare system. The goal went from making a profit on most enrollees to making a profit on all enrollees.

Information Security Officer Extraordinaire


Last year at this time, the running count already totaled approximately 27.8 million records compromised and 637 breaches reported. This year, that tally so far equals about 10.6 million records compromised and 483 breaches reported. It’s a testament to the progress the industry has made in the fundamentals of compliance and security best practices. But this year’s record is clearly far from perfect.

The VARs tale


The Canterbury Tales is a collection of stories written by Geoffrey Chaucer at the end of the 14th century. The tales were a part of a story telling contest between pilgrims going to Canterbury Cathedral with the prize being a free meal on their return. While the original is in Middle English, here is the VARs tale in modern day English.

In the beginning, the Value Added Reseller (VAR) represented products to the channel and it was good. Software publishers of note always preferred the indirect sales model and took great pains to cultivate the VAR or channel, and it was good. The VAR maintained the relationship with the end user and understood the nuances of their needs. The VAR gained the trust of the end user by first understanding, then recommending and finally supporting their needs with quality, unbiased recommendations, and it was good. End users in turn, trusted their VAR to look out for their needs and present and recommend the most suitable products.

Then came the cloud which appeared white and fluffy and unthreatening to the end user. But dark and foreboding to the VAR, the cloud was. It threatened to disrupt the established business model. It allowed the software publisher to sell product directly to the end user and bypass the VAR. And it was bad for the VAR. Google started it with Office Apps. Microsoft countered with Office 365. And it was bad for the VAR. And then McAfee did the same for their suite of security products. Now even the security focused VARs took note. Woe is me, said the VAR. Now software publishers are selling directly to the end user and I am bypassed. Soon the day will come when cats and dogs are friends. What are we to do?

Enter Quentin Reynolds who famously said, If you can’t lick ‘em, join them.” Can one roll back the cloud? No more than King Canute could stop the tide rolling in. This means what, then? It means a VAR must transition from being a reseller of product to one of services or better yet, a provider of services. In this way, may the VAR regain relevance with the end user and cement the trust built up over the years, between them.

Thus the VARs tale may have a happy ending wherein the end user has a more secure network, and the auditor being satisfied, returns to his keep and the VAR is relevant again.

Which service would suit, you ask? Well, consider one that is not a commodity, one that requires expertise, one that is valued by the end user, one that is not a set-and-forget. IT Security leaps to mind; it satisfies these criteria. Even more within this field is SIEM, Log Management, Vulnerability scan and Intrusion Detection, given their relevance to both security and regulatory compliance.

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