100 Log Management Uses #47 Malware defense (CAG control 12)


Today we continue our journey through the Consensus Audit Guidelines with a look at CAG 12 — Malware Defense. When people think about the pointy end of the stick for Malware prevention they typically think anti-virus, but log management can certainly improve your chances by adding defense in depth. We also examine some of the additional benefits log management provides.

By Ananth

Managing the virtualized enterprise historic NIST recommendations and more


Every drop in the business cycle brings out the ‘get more value for your money’ strategies.  For IT this usually means either use the tools you have to solve a wider range of problems or buy a tool that with fast initial payback and can be used to solve a wide range of other problems. This series looks at how different log management tasks can be applied to solve a wider range of problems beyond the traditional compliance and security drivers so that companies can get more value for their IT money.

100 Log Management Uses #46 Account Monitoring (CAG control 11)


Today’s Consensus Audit Guideline Control is a good one for logs — account monitoring. Account monitoring should go well beyond simply having a process to get rid of invalid accounts. Today we look at tips and tricks on things to look for in your logs such as excessive failed access to folders or machines, inactive accounts becoming active and other outliers that are indicative of an account being high-jacked.

By Ananth

100 Log Management Uses #45 Continuous vulnerability testing and remediation (CAG control 10)


Today we look at CAG Control 10 — continuous vulnerability testing and remediation. For this control, vulnerability scanning tools like Rapid7 or Tenable are the primary solutions, so how do logs help here? The reality is that most enterprises can’t patch critical infrastructure on a constant basis. There is often a fairly lengthy gap between when you have a known vulnerability and when the fix is applied and so it becomes even more important to monitor logs for system access, anti-virus status, changes in configuration and more.

By Ananth

100 Log Management Uses #44 Data access (CAG control 9)


We continue our journey through the Consensus Audit Guidelines and today look at Control 9 – data access on a need to know basis. Logs help with monitoring of the enforcement of these policies, and user activities such as file, folder access and trends should all be watched closely.

By Ananth

100 Log Management Uses #42 Administrator privileges and activities (CAG control 8)


Today’s CAG control is a good one for logs – monitoring administrator privileges and activities. As you can imagine, when an Admin account is hacked or when an Admin goes rogue, because of their power, the impact from the breach can be devastating. Luckily most Admin activity is logged so by analyzing the logs you can do a pretty good job of detecting problems.

By Ananth

100 Log Management Uses #41 Application Security (CAG control 7)


Today we move on to the Consensus Audit Guideline’s Control #7 on application security. The best approach to application security is to design it in from the start, but web applications are vulnerable in several fairly common ways many of which can lead to attacks that can be detected through analyzing web server logs.

By Ananth

100 Log Management Uses #40 Monitoring Audit Logs (CAG control 6)


Today on CAG we look at a dead obvious one for logging — monitoring audit logs! It is nice to see that the CAG authors put as much value behind a review of audit logs. We certainly believe it is a valuable exercise.

– By Ananth

100 Log Management Uses #39 Boundary defense (CAG control 5)


Today, after a brief holiday (it is Summer, after all), we continue our look at the SAN’s Consensus Audit Guidelines (CAG). Today we look at something very well suited for logs — boundary defense. Hope you enjoy it.

– By Ananth

EventTracker 6.3 review; Getting more from Log Management Correlation techniques and more


Smart Value: Getting more from Log Management Every dip in the business cycle brings out the ‘get more value for your money’ strategies, and our current “Kingda Ka style” economic drop only increases the strategy implementation urgency. For IT this usually means either use the tools you have to solve a wider range of problems or buy a tool that with fast initial payback and can be used to solve a wide range of other problems.

100 Log Management Uses #38 Meeting CAG controls 3 & 4


Today we continue our look at the Consensus Audit Guidelines, in this case CAG Controls 3 and 4 for maintaining secure configurations on system and network devices. We take a look at how log and configuration monitoring can ensure that configurations remain secure by detecting changes in the secured state.

By Ananth

100 Log Management Uses #37 Consensus Audit Guidelines (CAG) controls 1 and 2


Today we start in earnest on our Consensus Audit Guidelines (CAG) series by taking a look at CAG 1 and 2. Not hugely interesting from a log standpoint but there are some things that log management solutions like EventTracker can help you with.

By Ananth

100 Log Management uses #36 Meeting the Consensus Audit Guidelines (CAG)


Today we are going to begin another series on a standard that leverages logs. The Consensus Audit Guidelines, or CAG for short, is a joint initiative of SANS and a number of Federal CIO’s and CISO’s to put in place some lower level guidelines for FISMA. One of the criticisms of FISMA is that is it is very vague and implementation can be very different from agency to agency. The CAG is a series of recommendations that make it easier for IT to make measurable improvements in security by knocking off some low hanging targets. There are 20 CAG recommended controls and 15 of them can be automated. Over the next few weeks we will look at each one. Hope you enjoy it.

By Ananth

New NIST recommendations; Using Log Management to detect web vulnerabilities and more


Log and security event management tame the wild west environment of a university network Being a network administrator in a university environment is no easy task. Unlike the corporate world, a university network typically has few restrictions over who can gain access; what type or brand of equipment people use at the endpoint; how those endpoint devices are configured and managed; and what users do once they are on the network.

100 Log Management uses #35 OWASP web vulnerabilites wrap-up


We have been talking a lot recently about web vulnerabilities, specifically the OWASP Top 10 list. We have covered how logs can help detect signs of web attacks in OWASP A1 through A6. A7 – A10 cannot be detected by logging, but in this wrap-up of the OWASP series we’ll take a look at them.

-By Ananth

100 Log Management uses #34 Error handling in the web server


Today we conclude our series on OWASP vulnerabilities with a look at A6 — error handling in the web server. Careless or non-configuration of error handling in a web server gives a hacker quite a lot of useful information about the structure of your web application. While careful configuration can take care of many issues, hackers will still probe your application deliberately triggering error conditions to see what information is there to be had. In this video we look at how you can use web server logs to detect whether you are being probed by a potential hacker.

-By Ananth

100 Log Management uses #33 Detecting and preventing cross site request forgery attacks


Today’s video blog continues our series on web vulnerabilities. We look at OWASP A5 — cross site request forgery hacks and we discuss ways that Admins can help both prevent these attacks and detect them when they do occur.

-By Ananth

100 Log Management uses #32 Detecting insecure object references


Continuing on our OWASP series, today we look at Vulnerability A4, using object references to grab important information, and how logs can be used by Admins to detect signs of these attacks. We also look at some best practices you can employ on your servers to make these attacks more difficult.

By Ananth

100 Log Management uses #31 Detecting malicious file execution in the web server


Today’s video continues our series on web vulnerabilities. We look at OWASP A3 — malicious code execution attacks in the web server — and discuss ways that Admins can help both prevent these attacks and detect them when they do occur.

-By Ananth

Compromise to discovery


The Verizon Business Risk Team publishes a useful Data Breach Investigations Report drawn from over 500 forensic engagements over a four-year period.

The report describes a “Time Span of Breach” event broken into four stages of an attack. These are:

– Pre-Attack Research
– Point of Entry to Compromise
– Compromise to Discovery
– Discovery to Containment

The top two are under control of the attacker but the rest are under the control of the defender. Where log management is particularly useful would be in discovery. So what does the 2008 version of the DBIR show about the time between Compromise to Discovery? Months Sigh. Worse yet, in 70% of the cases, Discovery was the victim being notified by someone else.

Conclusion? Most victims do not have sufficient visibility into their own networks and equipment.

It’s not hard but it is tedious. The tedium can be relieved, for the most part, by a one-time setup and configuration of a log management system. Perhaps not the most exciting project you can think of but hard to beat for effectiveness and return on investment.

Ananth

100 Log Management uses #30 Detecting Web Injection Attacks


Today’s Log Management use case continues our look at web vulnerabilities from the OWASP website. We will look at vulnerability A2, or how injection techniques, particularly SQL injection can be detected by analyzing web server log files.

By Ananth

100 Log Management uses #29 Detecting XSS attacks


Today we begin our series on web vulnerabilities. The number 1 vulnerability on the OWASP list is cross site scripting or XSS. XSS seems to have replaced SQL injection as the new favorite for web attacker. We look at using web server logs to detect signs of these XSS attacks.

-Ananth

EventTracker gets 5 star review; 100 Log Management uses and more


Have your cake and eat it too- improve IT security, comply with multiple regulations while reducing operational costs and saving money Headlines don’t lie. The number and severity of security breaches suffered by companies has consistently increased over the past couple of years and statistics show that 9 out of 10 businesses will suffer an attack on their corporate network in 2009.

100 Log Management uses #28 Web application vulnerabilities


During my recent restful vacation down in Cancun I was able to reflect a bit on a pretty atypical use of logs. This actually turned into a series of 5 entries that look at using logs to trace web application vulnerabilities using the OWASP Top 10 Vulnerabilities as a base. Logs may not get all the OWASP top 10, but there are 5 that you can use logs to look for — and by periodic review ensure that your web applications are not being hacked. This is the intro. Hope you enjoy them.

[See post to watch Flash video] -Ananth

100 Log Management Uses #27 Printer logs


Back from my vacation and back to logs and log use cases! Here is a fairly obvious one — using logs to manage printers. IN this video, we look at the various events generated on Windows and what you can do with them.

-Ananth

Logs and forensics, a lesson in compliance and more


How logs support data forensics investigations Novak and his team have been involved in hundreds of investigations employing data forensics. He says log data is a vital resource in discovering the existence, extent and source of any security breach. “Computer logs are central and pivotal components to any forensic investigation,” according to Novak. “They are a ‘fingerprint’ that provides a record of computer and system activities that may demonstrate a data leak or security breach.” The incriminating activities might include failed login attempts

Some thoughts on SAAS


A few months ago I wrote some thoughts on cloud security and compliance.The other day I came across this interesting article in Network World about SaaS security and it got me thinking on the subject again. The Burton analyst quoted, Eric Maiwald, made some interesting and salient points about the challenges of SaaS security but he stopped short of explicitly addressing compliance issues. If you have a SaaS service and you are subject to any one of the myriad compliance regulations how will you demonstrate compliance if the SaaS app is processing critical data subject to the standard? And is the vendor passing a SAS-70 audit going to satisfy your auditors and free you of any compliance requirement?

Mr. Maiwald makes a valid point that you have to take care in thinking through the security requirements and put it in the contract with the SaaS vendor. The same can also be held true for any compliance requirement, but he raises an even more critical point where he states that SaaS vendors want to offer a one size fits all offering (rightly so, or else I would put forward we would see a lot of belly-up SaaS vendors). My question then becomes how can an SME that is generally subject to compliance mandates but lacks the purchasing power to negotiate a cost effective agreement with a SaaS vendor take advantage of the benefits such services provide? Are we looking at one of these chicken and egg situations where the SaaS vendors don’t see the demand because the very customers they would serve are unable to use their service without this enabling technology? At the very least I would think that SaaS vendors would benefit from putting in the same audit capability that the other enterprise application vendors are, and making that available (maybe for a small additional fee) to their customers. Perhaps it could be as simple as user and admin activity auditing, but it seems to me a no brainer – if a prospect is going to let critical data and services go outside their control they are going to want the same visibility as they had when it resided internally, or else it becomes a non-starter until the price is driven so far down that reward trumps risk. Considering we will likely see more regulation, not less, in the future that price may well be pretty close to zero.

– Steve Lafferty

Log Monitoring – real time or bust?


As a vendor of a log management solution, we come across prospects with a variety of requirements — consistent with a variety of needs and views of approaching problems.

Recently, one prospect was very insistent on “real-time” processing. This is perfectly reasonable but as with anything, when taken to an extreme, can be meaningless. In this instance, the “typical” use case (indeed the defining one) for the log management implementation was “a virus is making its way across the enterprise; I don’t have time to search or refine or indeed any user (slow) action; I need instant notification and ability to sort data on a variety of indexes instantly”.

As vendors we are conditioned to think “the customer is always right” but I wonder if the requirement is reasonable or even possible. Given specifics of a scenario, I am sure many vendors can meet the requirement — but in general? Not knowing which OS, which attack pattern, how logs are generated/transmitted?

I was reminded again by this blog by Bejtlich in which he explains that “If you only rely on your security products to produce alerts of any type, or blocks of any type, you will consistently be “protected” from only the most basic threats.”

While real-time processing of logs is a perfectly reasonable requirement, retrospective security analysis is the only way to get a clue as to attack patterns and therefore a defense.

 Ananth

100 Log Management uses #26 MS debug logs-Part II


Today is a continuation of our earlier look at Microsoft debug logs. Today we are going to look at logs from the Time and Task Scheduler services.

-By Ananth

100 Log Management uses #25 MS debug logs


MSdebug logs. Pretty arcane stuff but Sysadmins occasionally need to get deep into OS services such as group policy to debug problems in the OS. Logging for most of these types of services requires turning on in the registry as there is generally a performance penalty. We are going to look at a few examples over the next couple of days. Today we look at logs that are important on some older operating systems, while next time we look at services such as Time and Task Scheduler that are really most useful in the later Microsoft versions.

-By Ananth