WannaCry: Nuisance or catastrophe? What to expect next?


As we come to the one week point of the global pandemic of ransomware called WannaCry, it seems that while the infection gained worldwide (and unprecedented) news coverage, it has been more of a global nuisance than a global catastrophe. Some interesting points to note...

Do hackers prefer attacking over the weekend?


The recent WannaCry attack started on a Friday and it was feared that the results would be far more severe on Monday, as workers trickled back from the weekend. The fraudulent wires from Bangladesh Bank that resulted in $81M lost also happened on a Friday. A detailed account of how this weekend timing allowed hackers to get away a large sum (rerouted to the Philippines) with is described in this Reuters investigation.

WannaCry at Industrial Control Systems


A global pandemic of ransomware hit Windows based systems in 150 countries in a matter of hours. The root cause was traced to a vulnerability corrected by Microsoft for supported platforms (Win 7, 8.1 and higher) in March 2017, about 55 days before the malware was widespread. Detailed explanations and mitigation steps are described here. The first step to mitigation is to apply the update from Microsoft. A version for XP and 2003 was also released by Microsoft on Friday May 12, 2017.

WannaCry: Fraud follows fear


After the global pandemic of the WannaCry ransomware attack this past weekend, it’s entirely predictable that fraudsters would follow. After every major attack or vulnerability disclosure, criminals are quick to take advantage of the attendant fear by pitching phony schemes to “protect” those that are worried they may be, or may become, victims.

WannaCry: What it is and what to do about it


What happened For those of us in the IT Security profession, Friday May 12 was Black Friday. Networks in healthcare and critical infrastructure across at least 99 countries have been infected by the WannaCry ransomware worm, aka WanaCrypt, WannaCrypt or Wcry. The bulk of infections were reported in Russia, Taiwan and Spain.

Challenges with Threat Intelligence or why a Honeynet is a good idea


Shared threat intelligence is an attractive concept. The good guys share experiences about what the bad guys are doing thereby blunting attacks. This includes public-private partnerships like InfraGard, a partnership between the FBI and the private sector dedicated to sharing information and intelligence to prevent hostile acts against the U.S.

When a SIEM is Like an Exercise Machine Stuck Behind the Junk in Your Garage


I’m a big believer in security analytics and detective controls in general.  At least sometimes, bad guys are going to evade your preventive controls, and you need the critical defense-in-depth layers that detective controls provide through monitoring logs and all the other information a modern SIEM consumes. Better yet, going on the offensive with threat hunting approaches the concept of taking the battle to enemy instead of passively waiting.

Essential soft skills for cybersecurity success


IT workers in general, but more so IT Security professionals, pride themselves on their technical skills. Keeping abreast of the latest threats and the newest tactics to demonstrate to management and peers that one is “worthy.” The long alphabet soup in the signature, CISSP, CISA, MCSE, CCNA and so on, is all very necessary and impressive. However, cybersecurity puzzles are not solved by technical skills alone. In fact, the case can be made that soft skills are just as important, especially because everyone in the organization needs to cooperate. Security is everyone’s job.

Who suffers more — cybercrime victims or cybersecurity professionals?


So you got hit by a data breach, an all too common occurrence in today’s security environment. Who gets hit? Odds are you will say the customer. After all it’s their Personally Identifiable Information (PII) that was lost. Maybe their credit card or social security number or patient records were compromised. But pause a moment and consider the hit on the company itself. The hit includes attorney fees, lost business, reputational damage, and system remediation costs.

Top three high risk behaviors that compromise IT Security


The insider threat is typically much more infrequent than external attacks, but they usually pose a much higher severity of risk for organizations when they do happen. While they can be perpetrated by malicious actors, it is more common the result of negligence. In addition to investing in new security tools and technology to protect against external threats, companies should place higher priority on identifying and fixing internal risks. Here are the top 3 high risk behaviors that compromise IT security.

Man Bites Dog!


Made you look! It’s a clickbait headline, a popular tactic with the press to get people to click on their article. Cyber criminals, the ones after the gold in your network, are at heart, capitalists. In other words, they seek efficiency. How to get maximum returns for the minimum possible work. This tendency reveals itself in multiple ways.

Ransomware is only getting started


By Randy Franklin Smith Ransomware is about denying you access to your data via encryption. But that denial has to be of a great enough magnitude create sufficient motivation for the victim to pay. Magnitude of the denial is a factor – Value of the encrypted copy of the data, which is a function of: Intrinsic value of the data (irrespective of how many copies exist) The number of copies of the data and their availability Extent of operations interrupted

SIEMphonic and the Cyber Kill Chain


The Cyber Kill Chain model by Lockheed Martin describes how attackers use the cycle of compromise, persistence and ex filtration against an organization. Defense strategies that focus exclusively on the perimeter and on prevention do not take into account the kill chain life cycle approach; this is a reason why attackers are continuing to be so successful. Defending against persistent and advanced threats requires methods that detect and deny threats at each stage of the kill chain.

Spending too much or too little on IT Security?


A common assumption is that security expenditure is a proxy for security maturity. This may make sense at first blush but paradoxically, a low relative level of information security spending compared to peers can be equally indicative of a very well-run or a poorly run security program. Spending analysis is, therefore, imprecise and a potentially misleading indicator of program success. In fact, it is necessary to ensure that the right risks are being adequately managed, and understand that spending may fluctuate accordingly.

Compliance is not a proxy for due care


Regulatory compliance is a necessary step for IT leaders, but it’s not sufficient enough to reduce residual IT security risk to tolerable levels. This is not news. But why is this the case? Here are three reasons:

‘Twas the Night Before Christmas – an EventTracker Story


‘Twas the night before Christmas and all through HQ Not a creature was stirring, except greedy Lou – An insider thief who had planned with great care A breach to occur while no one was there. Lou began his attack without trepidation, For all his co-workers were on their vacations. He logged into Payroll and then in a flash Transferred to his account a large sum of cash. But Lou didn’t realize that what he was doing Had sent an alert that something was brewing.

Work Smarter – Not Harder: Use Internal Honeynets to Detect Bad Guys Instead of Just Chasing False Positives


Log collection, SIEM and security monitoring are the journey not the destination.  Unfortunately, the destination is often a false positive.  This is because we’ve gotten very good at collecting logs and other information from production systems, then filtering that data and presenting it on a dashboard.  But we haven’t gotten that good at distinguishing events triggered by bad guys from those triggered by normal everyday activity.

Top three reasons SIEM solutions fail


We have been implementing Security Information and Event Management (SIEM) solutions for more than 10 years. We serve hundreds of active SIEM users and implementations. We have had many awesome, celebratory, cork-popping successes. Unfortunately, we’ve also had our share of sad, tearful, profanity-filled failures.

How the EventTracker/Netsurion merger will bring you more powerful cybersecurity solutions


We are delighted that EventTracker is now part of the Netsurion family. On October 13, 2016 we announced our merger with managed security services Netsurion. As part of the agreement, Netsurion’s majority shareholder, Providence Strategic Growth, the equity affiliate of Providence Equity Partners, made an investment in EventTracker to accelerate growth for our combined company.

Tracking Physical Presence with the Windows Security Log


How do you figure out when someone was actually logged onto their PC? By “logged onto” I mean, physically present and interacting with their computer. The data is there in the security log, but it’s so much harder than you’d think. First of all, while I said it’s in the security log, I didn’t say which one. The bad news is, it isn’t in the domain controller log. Domain controllers know when you logon, but they don’t know when you logoff. This is because domain controllers just handle initial authentication to the domain and subsequent authentications to each computer on the network.

What is privilege escalation and why should you care?


A common hacking method is to steal information by first gaining lower-level access to your network. This can happen in a variety of ways: through a print server, via a phished email, or taking advantage of a remote control program with poor security. Once inside, the hacker will escalate their access rights until they find minimally protected administrative accounts.

Monitoring DNS Traffic for Security Threats


Cyber criminals are constantly developing increasingly sophisticated and dangerous malware programs. Statistics for the first quarter of 2016 compared to 2015 shows that malware attacks have quadrupled.

Idea to retire: Do more with less


Ideas to Retire is a TechTank series of blog posts that identify outdated practices in public sector IT management and suggest new ideas for improved outcomes. Dr. John Leslie King is W.W. Bishop Professor in the School of Information at the University of Michigan and contributed a blog hammering the idea of “do more with less” calling it a “well-intentioned but ultimately ridiculous suggestion.”

How to control and detect users logging onto unauthorized computers


Windows gives you several ways to control which computers can be logged onto with a given account.  Leveraging these features is a critical way to defend against persistent attackers.  By limiting accounts to appropriate computers you can

Detect Persistent Threats on a Budget


There’s a wealth of intelligence available in your DNS logs that can help you detect persistent threats. So how can you use them to see if your network has been hacked, or check for unauthorized access to sensitive intellectual property after business hours?

Dirty truths your SIEM vendor won’t tell you


Analytics is an essential component of a modern SIEM solution. The ability to crunch large volumes of log and security data in order to extract meaningful insight can lead to improvements in security posture. Vendors love to tell you all about features and how their particular product is so much better than the competition.

Should I be doing EDR? Why isn’t anti-virus enough anymore?


Detecting virus signatures is so last year. Creating a virus with a unique signature or hash is quite literally child’s play, and most anti-virus products catch just a few percent of the malware that is active these days. You need better tools, called endpoint detection and response (EDR), such as those that integrate with SIEMs, that can recognize errant behavior and remediate endpoints quickly.

Uncover C&C traffic to nip malware


In a recent webinar, we demonstrated techniques by which EventTracker monitors DNS logs to uncover attempts by malware to communicate with Command and Control (C&C) servers. Modern malware uses DNS to resolve algorithm generated domain names to find and communicate with C&C servers. These algorithms have improved by leaps and bounds since they were first see in Conficker.C. Early attempts were based on a fixed seed and so once the malware was caught, it could be decompiled to predict the domain names it would generate.

Maximize your SIEM ROI


Aristotle put forth the idea in his Poetics that a drama has three parts — a beginning or protasis, middle or epitasis, and end or catastrophe. Far too many SIEM implementations are considered to be catastrophes. Having implemented hundreds of such projects, here are the three parts of a SIEM implementation which if followed will in fact minimize the drama but maximize the ROI.

Detecting Ransomware: The Same as Detecting Any Kind of Malware?


Ransomware burst onto the scene with high profile attacks against hospitals, law firms and other organizations.  What is it and how can you detect it?  Ransomware is just another type of malware; there’s nothing particularly advanced about ransomware compared to other malware.