100 Log Management Uses #50 Data loss prevention (CAG 15)

Today we wrap up our series on the Consensus Audit Guidelines. Over the last couple of months we have looked at the 15 CAG controls that can be automated, and we have examined how log management and log management solutions such as EventTracker can help meet the Guidelines. Today we look at CAG 15 — data loss prevention and examine the many ways logs help in preventing data leakage.

By Ananth

100 Log Management Uses #49 Wireless device control (CAG control 14)

We now arrive at CAG Control 14. – Wireless Device Control. For this control specialty WIDS scanning tools are the primary defense, that and a lot of configuration policy. This control is primarily a configuration problem not a log problem. Log Management helps  in all the standard ways — collecting and correlating data, monitoring for signs of attack etc. Using EventTracker’s Change component, configuration data in the registry and file system of the client devices can also be collected and alerted on. Generally depending on how one sets the configuration policy, when a change is made it will generate either a log entry or a change in the registry or file system. In this way EventTracker provides a valuable means of enforcement.

By Ananth

100 Log Management Uses #48 Control of ports, protocols and services (CAG control 13)

Today we look at CAG Control 13 – limitation and control of Ports, Protocols and Services. Hackers search for these kinds of things — software installs for example may turn on services the installer never imagined may be vulnerable, and it is critical to limit new ports being opened or services installed. It is also a good idea to monitor for abnormal or new behavior that indicates that something has escaped internal controls — for instance a system suddenly broadcasting or receiving network traffic on a new Port is something suspicious that should be investigated, new installs or new Services being run is also worth investigation — we will take a look at how Log Management can help you monitor for such occurrences.

By Ananth

Doing the obvious – Why efforts like the Consensus Audit Guidelines are valuable

I came across this interesting (and scary if you are a business person) article in the Washington Post. In a nutshell pretty much every business banks electronically. Some cyber gangs in Eastern Europe have come up with a pretty clever method to swindle money from small and medium sized companies. They do a targeted email attack on the finance guys and get them to click on a bogus attachment – when they do so, key logging malware is installed that harvests electronic bank account passwords. These passwords are then used to transfer large sums of money to the bad guys.

The article is definitely worth a read for a number of reasons, but what I found surprising was first that businesses do not have the same protection from electronic fraud as consumers do so the banks don’t monitor commercial account activity as closely, and second, just how much this type of attack is happening. Turns out businesses only have 2 days to report fraudulent activity instead of a consumer’s 60 days so businesses that suffer a loss usually don’t recover their money.

My first reaction was to ring up our finance guys and tell them about the article. Luckily their overall feel was that since Marketing spent the money as quickly as the Company made it, we were really not too susceptible to this type of attack as we had no money to steal – an unanticipated benefit of a robust (and well paid, naturally!) marketing group. I did make note of this helpful point for use during budget and annual review time.

My other thought was how this demonstrated the usefulness of efforts like the Consensus Audit Guidelines from SANS. Sometime security personnel pooh-pooh the basics but you can make it lot harder on the bad guys with some pretty easy blocking and tackling activity. CAG Control 12 talks about monitoring for active and updated anti-virus and anti-spyware on all systems. Basic, but it really helps – remember a business does not have 60 days but 2. You can’t notice the malware a week after the signatures finally get updated.

There are a number of other activities that can also really help to prevent these attacks in advanced tools such as EventTracker such as change monitoring, tracking first time executable launch, monitoring the AV application has not been shut down and monitoring network activity for anomalous behavior, but that is a story for another day. If you can’t do it all, at least start with the obvious – you might not be safe, but you will be safer.

Steve Lafferty

100 Log Management Uses #47 Malware defense (CAG control 12)

Today we continue our journey through the Consensus Audit Guidelines with a look at CAG 12 — Malware Defense. When people think about the pointy end of the stick for Malware prevention they typically think anti-virus, but log management can certainly improve your chances by adding defense in depth. We also examine some of the additional benefits log management provides.

By Ananth

100 Log Management Uses #46 Account Monitoring (CAG control 11)

Today’s Consensus Audit Guideline Control is a good one for logs — account monitoring. Account monitoring should go well beyond simply having a process to get rid of invalid accounts. Today we look at tips and tricks on things to look for in your logs such as excessive failed access to folders or machines, inactive accounts becoming active and other outliers that are indicative of an account being high-jacked.

By Ananth

100 Log Management Uses #45 Continuous vulnerability testing and remediation (CAG control 10)

Today we look at CAG Control 10 — continuous vulnerability testing and remediation. For this control, vulnerability scanning tools like Rapid7 or Tenable are the primary solutions, so how do logs help here? The reality is that most enterprises can’t patch critical infrastructure on a constant basis. There is often a fairly lengthy gap between when you have a known vulnerability and when the fix is applied and so it becomes even more important to monitor logs for system access, anti-virus status, changes in configuration and more.

By Ananth

100 Log Management Uses #44 Data access (CAG control 9)

We continue our journey through the Consensus Audit Guidelines and today look at Control 9 – data access on a need to know basis. Logs help with monitoring of the enforcement of these policies, and user activities such as file, folder access and trends should all be watched closely.

By Ananth

100 Log Management Uses #42 Administrator privileges and activities (CAG control 8)

Today’s CAG control is a good one for logs – monitoring administrator privileges and activities. As you can imagine, when an Admin account is hacked or when an Admin goes rogue, because of their power, the impact from the breach can be devastating. Luckily most Admin activity is logged so by analyzing the logs you can do a pretty good job of detecting problems.

By Ananth

100 Log Management Uses #41 Application Security (CAG control 7)

Today we move on to the Consensus Audit Guideline’s Control #7 on application security. The best approach to application security is to design it in from the start, but web applications are vulnerable in several fairly common ways many of which can lead to attacks that can be detected through analyzing web server logs.

By Ananth

100 Log Management Uses #40 Monitoring Audit Logs (CAG control 6)

Today on CAG we look at a dead obvious one for logging — monitoring audit logs! It is nice to see that the CAG authors put as much value behind a review of audit logs. We certainly believe it is a valuable exercise.

– By Ananth

100 Log Management Uses #39 Boundary defense (CAG control 5)

Today, after a brief holiday (it is Summer, after all), we continue our look at the SAN’s Consensus Audit Guidelines (CAG). Today we look at something very well suited for logs — boundary defense. Hope you enjoy it.

– By Ananth

100 Log Management Uses #38 Meeting CAG controls 3 & 4

Today we continue our look at the Consensus Audit Guidelines, in this case CAG Controls 3 and 4 for maintaining secure configurations on system and network devices. We take a look at how log and configuration monitoring can ensure that configurations remain secure by detecting changes in the secured state.

By Ananth

100 Log Management Uses #37 Consensus Audit Guidelines (CAG) controls 1 and 2

Today we start in earnest on our Consensus Audit Guidelines (CAG) series by taking a look at CAG 1 and 2. Not hugely interesting from a log standpoint but there are some things that log management solutions like EventTracker can help you with.

By Ananth

100 Log Management uses #36 Meeting the Consensus Audit Guidelines (CAG)

Today we are going to begin another series on a standard that leverages logs. The Consensus Audit Guidelines, or CAG for short, is a joint initiative of SANS and a number of Federal CIO’s and CISO’s to put in place some lower level guidelines for FISMA. One of the criticisms of FISMA is that is it is very vague and implementation can be very different from agency to agency. The CAG is a series of recommendations that make it easier for IT to make measurable improvements in security by knocking off some low hanging targets. There are 20 CAG recommended controls and 15 of them can be automated. Over the next few weeks we will look at each one. Hope you enjoy it.

By Ananth