Why a Co-Managed SIEM?

In simpler times, security technology approaches were clearly defined and primarily based on prevention with things like firewalls, anti-virus, web, and email gateways. There were relatively few available technology segments and a relatively clear distinction between buying security technology purchases and outsourcing engagements.

Organizations invested in the few well-known, broadly used security technologies themselves, and if outsourcing the management of these technologies was needed, they could be reasonably confident that all major security outsourcing providers would be able to support their choice of technology.

Gartner declared this was a market truth for both on-premises management of security technologies and remote monitoring/management of the network security perimeter (managed security services).

Gartner Magic Quadrant

So, what has changed? A recent survey of over 300 IT professionals by SC Magazine indicates two main factors at play (get the full report here ). The increasing complexity of the threat landscape has spawned more complex and expensive security technologies to combat those threats. This escalation in cost and complexity is then exacerbated by budget constraints and an ultra-tight cybersecurity labor market.

Net result? The “human element” is back into the forefront of security management discussions. The skilled security analyst and subject matter expert for the technology in use have become exponentially more difficult to recruit, hire, and retain. The market agrees: The security gear is only as good as the people you are able to get to manage it.

With the threat landscape of today, the focus is squarely on detection, response, prediction, continuous monitoring and analytics. This means a successful outcome is critically dependent on the “human element.” The choices are to procure security technology and:

  • Deploy adequate internal resources to use them effectively, or
  • Co-source the staffing who already has experience with the selected technology (for instance, using our Co-managed SIEM)

If co-sourcing is a thought, then selection criteria must consider the expertise of the provider with the selected security technology. Our Co-managed SIEM offering bundles comprehensive technology with expertise in its use.

Technology represents 20% or less of the overall challenges to better security outcomes. The “human element” coupled with mature processes are the rest of the iceberg, hiding beneath the waterline.

Idea to retire: Do more with less

Ideas to Retire is a TechTank series of blog posts that identify outdated practices in public sector IT management and suggest new ideas for improved outcomes.

Dr. John Leslie King is W.W. Bishop Professor in the School of Information at the University of Michigan and contributed a blog hammering the idea of “do more with less” calling it a “well-intentioned but ultimately ridiculous suggestion.”

King writes: “Doing more with less flies in the face of what everyone already knows: we do less with less. This is not our preference, of course. Most of us would like to do less, especially if we could have more. People are smart: they do not volunteer to do more if they will get less. Doing more with less turns incentive upside down. Eliminating truly wasteful practices and genuine productivity gains sometimes allows us to do more with less, but these cases are rare. The systemic problems with HealthCare.gov were not solved by spending less, but by spending more. Deep wisdom lies in matching inputs with outputs.”

IT managers should respond to suggestions of doing more with less by assessing what really needs to be done…what can reasonably be discarded or added that enables the IT staff to go about their responsibilities without exceeding their limits?

Considering these ideas as they relate to IT Security, a way to optimize input with outputs may be by considering a co-managed solution focused on outcome. Rather than merely acquiring technology and then watching it gather dust as you struggle to build process and train (non-existent) staff to utilize it properly, start with the end in mind – the desired outcome. If this is a well managed SIEM solution, (and associated technology) then perhaps a co-managed SIEM approach may provide the way to match output with input.

Dirty truths your SIEM vendor won’t tell you

Analytics is an essential component of a modern SIEM solution. The ability to crunch large volumes of log and security data in order to extract meaningful insight can lead to improvements in security posture. Vendors love to tell you all about features and how their particular product is so much better than the competition.

Yeah, right!

The fact is, many products are available and most of them have comparable features. While software is a necessary part of the analytics process, it’s less critical than product marketing hype would have you believe.

As Meta Brown noted in Forbes, “Your own thought processes – the effort you put in to understand the business problem, investigate the data available, and plan a methodical approach to analysis – can do much more to simplify your work and maximize your chance for success than any product could.”

Techies just love to show off their tech macho. They can’t get together without arguing about the power of their code, speed of their response or the size of their clusters.

The reality? Once you invested in any of the comparable products, it’s the person behind the wheel that makes all the difference.

If you suffer from skill shortage, our remote managed SIEM Simplified solution may be for you.

Research points to SIEM-as-a-Service

SC Magazine released the results of a research survey focused on the rising acceptance of SIEM-as-a-Service for the small and medium sized enterprise.

The survey, conducted in April 2016, found that SMEs and companies with $1 billion or more in revenue or 5,000-plus employees faced similar challenges:

  • 64 percent of respondents agreed that they “lack the time to manage all the security activities.”
  • 49 percent reported a lack of internal staff to address IT security challenges
  • 48 percent said they lacked the IT security budget needed to meet those challenges

This come as no surprise to us. We’ve been seeing these trends rise over the past several years. Gartner reports that by 2019, total enterprise spending on security outsourcing services will be 75 percent of the spending on security software and hardware products, and that by 2020, 40 percent of all security technology acquisitions will be directly influenced by managed security service provider (MSSP) and on-premises security outsourcing providers, up from less than 15% today.

It used to be that firewalls and antivirus were sufficient enough stop gaps; but in today’s complex threatscape, the cyber criminals are more sophisticated. The weak point of any security approach is usually the unwitting victim of a phishing scam or the person who plugs in the infected USB; but “securing the human” requires the expertise of other humans, trained staff with the certification and expertise to monitor the network and analyze the anomalies. An already busy IT staff can become even more overburdened; identifying, training and keeping security expertise is hard. So is keeping up with the alerts that come in on a daily basis, and being current on the SIEM technology.

Thus, the increasing movement towards a co-managed SIEM which allows the enterprise to have access to the expertise and resources they need to run an effective security program without ceding control. SIEM-as-a-Service: saving time and money.

You can download the SC Magazine report here.

2015 Cyber Attack Trends — 2016 Implications

Red teams attack, blue teams defend.
That’s us – defending our network.

So what attack trends were observed in 2015? And what do they portend for us blue team members in 2016?

The range of threats included trojans, worms, trojan downloaders and droppers, exploits and bots (backdoor trojans), among others. When untargeted (more common), the goal was profit via theft. When targeted, they were often driven by ideology.

Over the years, attackers have had to evolve their tactics to get malware onto computers that have improved security levels. Attackers are increasingly using social engineering to compromise computer systems because vulnerabilities in operating systems have become harder to find and exploit.

Ransomware that seeks to extort victims by encrypting their data is the new normal, replacing rogue security software or fake antivirus software of yesteryear that was used to trick people into installing malware and disclosing credit card information. Commercial exploit kits now dominate the list of top exploits we see trying to compromise unpatched computers, which means the exploits that computers are exposed to on the Internet are professionally managed and constantly optimized at an increasingly quick rate.

However, one observation made by Tim Rains, Chief Security Advisor at Microsoft was, “although attackers have accumulated more tricks and tactics and seem to be using them in a more focused, fast paced way, they still focus on a relatively small number of ways to compromise computers.” These include:

  • Unpatched vulnerabilities
  • Misconfigured computers
  • Weak passwords
  • Social engineering

In fact, Rains goes on to note: “Notice I didn’t use the word ‘advanced.’

As always, it’s back to basics for blue team members. The challenge is to defend:

  • At scale (every device on the network, no exceptions)
  • Continuously (even on weekends, holidays etc.), and
  • Update/upgrade tactics constantly

If this feels like Mission Impossible, then you may be well served by a co-managed service offering in which some of the heavy lifting can be taken on by a dedicated team.

Your SIEM relationship status: It’s complicated

On Facebook, when two parties are sort-of-kind-of together but also sort-of, well, not, their relationship status reads, “It’s complicated.” Oftentimes, Party A really wants to like Party B, but Party B keeps doing and saying dumb stuff that prevents Party A from making a commitment.

Is it like that between you and your SIEM?

Here are dumb things that a SIEM can do to prevent you from making a commitment:

  • Require a lot of work, giving little in return
  • Be high maintenance, cost a lot to keep around
  • Be complex to operate, require lots of learning
  • Require trained staff to operate

Simplify your relationship with your SIEM with a co-managed solution.

Top 5 SIEM complaints

Here’s our list of the Top 5 SIEM complaints:

1) We bought a security information and event management (SIEM) system, but it’s too complicated and time-consuming, so we’re:

a) Not using it
b) Only using it for log collection
c) Taking log feeds, but not monitoring the alerts
d) Getting so many alerts that we can’t keep up with them
e) Way behind because the person who knew about the SIEM left

2) We’re updating technology and need to retrain to support it

3) It’s hard to find, train and retain security expertise

4) We don’t have enough trained staff to manage all of our devices

5) We don’t have trained resources to successfully respond to a security incident

What’s an IT Manager to do?
Get a co-managed solution, of course.
Here’s our’s. It’s called SIEM Simplified.
Billions of logs analyzed daily. See what we’ve caught.

The Cost of False IT Security Alarms

Think about the burglar alarm systems that are common in residential neighborhoods. In the eye of the passive observer, an alarm system makes a lot of sense. They watch your home while you’re asleep or away, and call the police or fire department if anything happens. So for a small monthly fee you feel secure. Unfortunately, there are a few things that the alarm companies don’t tell you.

1)      Between 95% and 97% of calls (depending on the time of year) are false alarms.

2)      The police regard calls from alarm companies as the lowest priority and it can take anywhere between 20-30 minutes for them to arrive. It only takes the average burglar 5 minutes to break and enter, and be off with your valuables.

3)      In addition to this, if your call does turn out to be a false alarm, the police and fire department have introduced hefty fines. It is about $130 for the police to be called out, and if fire trucks are sent, they charge around $410 per truck (protocol is to send 3 trucks). So as you can see, one false alarm can cost you well over $1,200.

With more than 2 million annual burglaries in the U.S., perhaps it’s worth putting up with so many false positives in service of the greater deterrent? Yes, provided we can sort out the false alarms which sap the first responder.

The same is true of information security. If we know which alerts to respond to, we can focus our time on those important alerts. Tuning the system to reduce the alerts, and removing the false positives so we can concentrate only on valid alerts, gives us the ability to respond only to the security events that truly matter.

While our technology does an excellent job of detecting possible security events, it’s our service, which examines these alerts and provides experts who make it relevant using context and judgement, that makes the difference between a rash of false positives and the ones that truly matter.

SIEM: Sprint or Marathon?

Winning a marathon requires dedication and preparation. Over long periods of time. A sprint requires intense energy but for a short period of time. While some tasks in IT Security are closer to a sprint (e.g., configuring a firewall), many, like deploying and using a Security Information and Event Management (SIEM) solution, are closer to a marathon.

What are the hard parts?

  1. Identifying the scope
  2. Ingesting log data and filtering out noise events
  3. Reviewing the data with discipline

Surveys show that 75% of organizations need to perform significant discovery to determine which devices, platforms, applications and databases should be included in the scope for log monitoring. The point is that when most companies really evaluate their log monitoring process, most of them don’t really know what systems are even available for them to include. They don’t know what they have. Additionally, 50% of organizations later realize that this initial discovery phase is not sufficient to meet their security needs. So, even after performing the discovery, they are not sure they have identified the right systems.

While on-boarding new clients, we usually identify legacy systems or firewall policies that generate large volumes of unnecessary data. This includes discovery of service accounts or scripts with expired credentials that appear to generate suspicious looking login failures. Other common items uncovered include network health monitoring systems which generate an abnormal amount of ICMP or SNMP activity, backup tools and internal applications using non-standard ports and cleartext protocols. Each of these false positives or legitimate activities add straw to the haystack(s), which makes it more difficult to find the needle. Every network contains activities that might appear suspicious or benign to an outside observer that lacks background on everyday activities of the company being monitored. It is important for network and security administrators to provide monitoring tools with additional context and background detail to account for the variety of networks that are thrown at them.

Reviewing the data with discipline is a difficult ask for organizations with a lean IT staff. Since IT is often viewed as a “cost center,” it is rare to see organizations (esp. mid-sized ones) with suitably trained IT Security staff.

Take heart — if getting there using only internal resources is a hard problem, our SIEM Simplified service gets you there. The bonus is the cost savings compared to a DIY approach.

Stuff the turkey, not the SIEM

Did you know that SIEM and Log Management are different?

The latter (log management) is all about collecting logs first and worrying about why you need them second (if at all). The objective is “let’s collect it all and have it indexed for possible review. Why? Because we can.”

The former (SIEM) is about specific security use cases. SIEM is a use-case driven technology. Use cases are implementation specific, unlike antivirus or firewalls.
Treating SIEM like Log Management, is a lot like a turducken.

Don’t want that bloated feeling like Aunt Mildred explains here? Then don’t stuff your SIEM with logs absent a use case.

Need help doing this effectively? A co-managed SIEM may be your best bet.

Effective cyber security by empowering people

You have, no doubt, heard that cyber security is everyone’s job. So then, as the prime defender of your network, what specifically are you doing to empower people so they can all act as sentries? After all, security cannot be automated as much as you’d like. Human adversaries will always be smarter than automated tools and will leverage human ingenuity to skirt around your protections.

But, marketing departments in overdrive are busy selling the notion of “magic” boxes that can envelope you in a protective shell against Voldemort and his minions. But isn’t that really just fantasy? The reality is that you can’t replace well-trained security professionals exercising judgment with computers.

So what does an effective security buyer do?

Answer: Empower the people by giving them tools that multiply their impact and productivity, instead of trying to replace them.

When we were designing EventTracker 8, an oft repeated observation from users was the shortage of senior analysts. If they existed at all in the organization, they were busy with higher level tasks such as policy creation, architecture updates and sometimes critical incident response. The last task on their plates was the bread-and-butter of log review and threat monitoring. Such tasks are often the purview of junior analysts (if they exist). In response, many of the features of EventTracker 8 are designed specifically to enable junior administrators to make effective contributions to cyber security.

Still feeling overwhelmed by the daily tasks that need doing, consoles that need watching, alerts that need triaging? Don’t fret – that is precisely what our SIEM Simplified service (SIEMaas) is designed to provide – as much, or as little help as you need. Become empowered, be effective.

Can you defeat a casual attacker?

The news is rife with stories on “advanced” and “persistent” attacks, in the same way as exotic health problems like Ebola. The reality is that you are much more likely to come down with the common cold than Ebola. Thus, it makes more sense to pay close attention to what the Center for Disease Control has to say about it than to stockpile Ebola serum.

In similar vein, how good is your organization in fighting basic, commodity attacks?

It is true that the scary monsters called 0-day, advanced/persistent attacks and state sponsored superhackers are real. But before worrying about these, how are you set up for traditional intrusion attempts that use (5+) year old tools, tactics and exploits? After all, the vast majority of successful attacks are low tech and old school.

Want to rapidly improve your security maturity? Consider SIEM Simplified, our surprisingly affordable service that can protect you from 90% of the attacks for 10% of the do-it-yourself cost.

Can you predict attacks?

The “kill chain” is a military concept related to the structure of an attack. In the InfoSec area, this concept is a way of modeling intrusions on a computer network.

Threats occur in up to seven stages. Not all threats need to use every stage, and the actions available at each stage can vary, giving an almost unlimited diversity to attack sets.

  • Reconnaisance
  • Weaponization
  • Delivery
  • Exploitation
  • Installation
  • Command and Control
  • Actions on Objective

Of course, some of the steps can happen outside the defended network, and in those cases, it may not be possible or practical to identify or counter. However, the most common variety of attack is unstructured in nature and originates from external sources. These use scripts or commonly available cracking tools that are widely available. Such attacks are identified by many techniques including:

Evidence of such activities is a pre-cursor to an attack. If defenders observe the activities from external sources, then it is important to review what the targets are. Often times, these can be uncovered by a penetration test. Repeated attempts against specific targets are a clue.

A defense-in-depth strategy gives defenders multiple clues about such activities. These include IDS systems that detect attack signatures, logs showing the activities and vulnerability scans that identify weaknesses.

To be sure, defending requires carefully orchestrated expertise. Feeling overwhelmed? Take a look at our SIEM Simplified offering where we can do the heavy lifting.

The Attack on your infrastructure: a play in three parts

To defend against an attacker, you must know him and his methods. The typical attack launched on an IT infrastructure can be thought of in three stages.

Part 1: Establish a beachhead

The villain lures the unsuspecting victim to install malware. This can be done in a myriad of ways: by sending an attachment from an apparently trustworthy source, causing a drive by infection through a website hosting malware, or via a USB drive. Attackers target the weakest link, the less guarded desktop or a test system. Frontal assaults against heavily fortified and carefully watched servers are not practical.

Once installed, the malware usually copies itself to multiple spots to deter eradication and it can possibly “phone home” for further instructions. Malware usually lurks in the background, trying to obtain passwords or system lists to further enable Part 2.

Part 2: Move laterally

As a means to deter removal, malware will move laterally, copying itself to other machines/locations. This movement is also often from peripheral to more central systems (e.g., from workstations to file shares).

Part 3: Exfiltrate secrets

Having patiently gathered up (usually zip or rar) secrets (intellectual property, passwords, credit card info, PII, etc.), the malware (or attacker)now sends the data outside the network back to the attacker.
How do you defend yourself against this? A SIEM solution can help, or a managed SIEM solution if you are short on expertise.

Outsourcing versus As-a-Service

The (toxic) term “outsourcing” has long been vilified as the substitution of onshore jobs with cheaper offshore people. As noted here, outsourcing, by and large, has really always been about people. The story of outsourcing to-date is of service providers battling it out to deliver people-based services more productively, promising delights of delivery beyond merely doing the existing stuff significantly cheaper and a bit better.

When it comes to SIEM-as-a-service though, the game-changer is centered on today’s services work as a genuine blending of people-plus-technology. This empowers service buyers to focus on value-addition through meaningful and secure data, enabled by a sophisticated tool. All good, but recognize this is fundamentally made possible by smart people working together, your team and ours.

Business services, today, are one of speed to business impact. They are about simplification. They are about removing any blockage or obstacle diluting this business impact.

We refer to our SIEM Simplified service offering as co-managed. Inherent in the term is the acknowledgement that our team must work with your to deliver value. The “simplified” part is all about the removal of unneeded complexity.

That transition to As-a-Service is all about simplification — removing unnecessary complexity, poor processes and manual intervention to make way for a more nimble way of running a business. It is also about prioritizing where to focus investments to achieve maximum benefit and impact for the business from its operations.

Does sharing Threat Intel work?

In the next couple months, Congress will likely pass CISA, the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act. The purpose is to “codify mechanisms for enabling cybersecurity information sharing between private and government entities, as well as among private entities, to better protect information systems and more effectively respond to cybersecurity incidents.”

Can it help? It’s interesting to note two totally opposing views.

Arguing that it will help is Richard Bejtlich of Brookings. His analogy is Threat intelligence, is in some ways like a set of qualified sales leads provided to two companies. The first has a motivated sales team, polished customer acquisition and onboarding processes, authority to deliver goods and services and quality customer support. The second business has a small sales team, or perhaps no formal sales team. Their processes are broken, and they lack authority to deliver any goods or services, which in this second case isn’t especially valuable. Now, consider what happens when each business receives a bundle of qualified sales leads. Which business will make the most effective use of their list of profitable, interested buyers? The answer is obvious, and there are parallels to the information security world.

Arguing that it won’t help at all is Robert Graham, the creator of BlackICE Guard. His argument is “CISA does not work. Private industry already has exactly the information sharing the bill proposes, and it doesn’t prevent cyber-attacks as CISA claims. On the other side, because of the false-positive problem, CISA does far more to invade privacy than even privacy advocates realize, doing a form of mass surveillance.”

In our view, Threat Intel is a new tool. It’s usefulness depends on the artisan wielding the tool. A poorly skilled user would get less value.

Want experts on your team but don’t know where to start? Try our managed service SIEM Simplified. Start quick and leverage your data!

Death by a Thousand cuts

You may recall that back in 2012, then Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta warned of “a cyber Pearl Harbor; an attack that would cause physical destruction and the loss of life.”

This hasn’t quite come to pass has it? Is it dumb luck? Or are we just waiting for it to happen?

In his annual testimony about the intelligence community’s assessment of “global threats,” Director of National Intelligence James Clapper sounded a more nuanced and less hyperbolic tone. “Rather than a ‘cyber Armageddon’ scenario that debilitates the entire U.S. infrastructure, we envision something different,” he said, “We foresee an ongoing series of low-to-moderate level cyber attacks from a variety of sources over time, which will impose cumulative costs on U.S. economic competitiveness and national security.”

The reality is that the U.S. is being bombarded by cyber attacks of a smaller scale every day—and those campaigns are taking a toll.

Now the DNI also went on to say “Although cyber operators can infiltrate or disrupt targeted [unclassified] networks, most can no longer assume that their activities will remain undetected, nor can they assume that if detected, they will be able to conceal their identities. Governmental and private sector security professionals have made significant advances in detecting and attributing cyber intrusions.”

Alan Paller of the SANS Institute says “Those words translate directly to a simpler statement: ‘The weapons and other systems we operate today cannot be protected from cyber attack.’ Instead, as a nation, we have to put in place the people and support systems who can find the intruders and excise them fast.”

So then what capabilities do you have in this area given that the attacks are continuous and ongoing against your infrastructure?

Want to do something about it quickly and effectively? Consider SIEM Simplified our service offering that can take the heavy lift required to implement such monitoring programs off your hands.

SIEM is Sunlight

Security Information and Event Management (SIEM) refers to technology that provides real-time analysis of security alerts generated by network hardware and applications. SIEM works by gathering, analyzing and presenting information from a variety of sources of such information across the enterprise network including network and security devices; identity and access management applications; vulnerability management and policy compliance tools; operating system, database and application logs; and external threat data.

All compliance frameworks including PCI-DSS, HIPAA, FISMA, NERC etc call for the implementation and regular usage of SIEM technology. The absence of regular usage is noted as a major factor in post-mortem analysis of IT security related incidents.

Why is this the case? It’s because SIEM, when implemented properly gathers security data from all the nooks and crannies of the enterprise network. When this information is collated and presented well, an analyst is able to see what is happening, what happened and what is different.

It’s akin to letting in the sunlight to all corners and hidden places. You can see better, much better.

You can’t fix what you can’t see and don’t know. Knowledge of the goings-on in the various parts of the network, in real-time when possible, is the first step towards building a meaningful security defense.

EventTracker and Poodle

Summary:
• All systems and applications utilizing the Secure Socket Layer (SSL) 3.0 with cipher-block chaining (CBC) mode ciphers may be vulnerable. However, the POODLE (Padding Oracle On Downgraded Legacy Encryption) attack demonstrates this vulnerability using web browsers and web servers, which is one of the most likely exploitation scenarios.
• EventTracker v7.x is implemented above IIS on the Windows platform and there MAY be vulnerable to POODLE depending on the configuration of IIS..
• ETIDS and ETVAS which are offered as options of the SIEM Simplified service, are based on CentOS v6.5 which uses Apache and may also be vulnerable, depending on the configuration of Apache.

1. Poodle Scan can be used to test if your server is vulnerable
• Below are the links relevant to this vulnerability:

http://nvd.nist.gov/view/vuln/detail?vulnId=CVE-2014-3566
https://www.us-cert.gov/ncas/alerts/TA14-290A
http://www.dotnetnoob.com/2013/10/hardening-windows-server-20082012-and.html
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/187498

• If you are a subscriber to SIEM Simplified service, the EventTracker Control Center has already initiated action to patch this vulnerability on your behalf. Please contact ecc@eventtracker.com with any questions.
• If you maintain EventTracker yourself, this document explains how you can update your installation to remove the vulnerability against SSL 3.0

Details:
The SSL 3.0 vulnerability stems from the way blocks of data are encrypted under a specific type of encryption algorithm within the SSL protocol. The POODLE attack takes advantage of the protocol version negotiation feature built into SSL/TLS to force the use of SSL 3.0 and then leverages this new vulnerability to decrypt select content within the SSL session. The decryption is done byte by byte and will generate a large number of connections between the client and server.

While SSL 3.0 is an old encryption standard and has generally been replaced by Transport Layer Security (TLS) (which is not vulnerable in this way), most SSL/TLS implementations remain backwards compatible with SSL 3.0 to interoperate with legacy systems in the interest of a smooth user experience. Even if a client and server both support a version of TLS the SSL/TLS protocol suite allows for protocol version negotiation (being referred to as the “downgrade dance” in other reporting). The POODLE attack leverages the fact that when a secure connection attempt fails, servers will fall back to older protocols such as SSL 3.0. An attacker who can trigger a connection failure can then force the use of SSL 3.0 and attempt the new attack.

Solution:
• If you have installed EventTracker on Microsoft Windows Server and are maintaining it yourself, please download the Disable Weak Cyphers file to the server running EventTracker. Extract and save DisableWeakCiphers.bat; run this file as Administrator. This file executes the following commands:

REG.EXE ADD “HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\SecurityProviders\SCHANNEL\Protocols\SSL 2.0\Server” /v Enabled /t REG_DWORD /d 0 /f
REG.EXE ADD “HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\SecurityProviders\SCHANNEL\Protocols\SSL 2.0\Client” /v Enabled /t REG_DWORD /d 0 /f
REG.EXE ADD “HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\SecurityProviders\SCHANNEL\Protocols\SSL 3.0\Server” /v Enabled /t REG_DWORD /d 0 /f
REG.EXE ADD “HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\SecurityProviders\SCHANNEL\Protocols\SSL 3.0\Client” /v Enabled /t REG_DWORD /d 0 /f
REG.EXE ADD “HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\SecurityProviders\SCHANNEL\Ciphers\DES 56/56” /v Enabled /t REG_DWORD /d 00000000 /f
REG.EXE ADD “HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\SecurityProviders\SCHANNEL\Ciphers\RC2 40/128” /v Enabled /t REG_DWORD /d 00000000 /f
REG.EXE ADD “HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\SecurityProviders\SCHANNEL\Ciphers\RC2 56/128” /v Enabled /t REG_DWORD /d 00000000 /f
REG.EXE ADD “HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\SecurityProviders\SCHANNEL\Ciphers\RC2 128/128” /v Enabled /t REG_DWORD /d 00000000 /f
REG.EXE ADD “HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\SecurityProviders\SCHANNEL\Ciphers\RC4 40/128” /v Enabled /t REG_DWORD /d 00000000 /f
REG.EXE ADD “HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\SecurityProviders\SCHANNEL\Ciphers\RC4 56/128” /v Enabled /t REG_DWORD /d 00000000 /f
REG.EXE ADD “HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\SecurityProviders\SCHANNEL\Ciphers\RC4 64/128” /v Enabled /t REG_DWORD /d 00000000 /f

Spray & Pray or 80/20

If you spend any time at all looking at log data from any server that is accessible to the Internet, you will be shocked at the brazen attempts to knock the castle over. They being within minutes of the server being available. They most commonly include port scans, login attempts using default username/password, web server attacks described by OWASP.

How can this possibly be? Given the sheer number of machines that are visible on the Internet? Don’t these guys have anything better to do?

The answer is automation and scripted attacks, also known as spray and pray. The bad guys are capitalists too (regardless of country of origin!) and need to maximize their effort, computing capacity and network bandwidth usage. Accordingly, they use automation to “knock on all available doors in a wealthy neighborhood” as efficiently and regularly as possible. Why pick on servers in developed countries? Because that’s where the payoff is likely to be higher. Its Risk v. Reward all the way.

The automated (first) wave of these attacks is to identify vulnerable machines and establish presence. Following waves may be staffed depending on the the location and identity and thus the potential value to be obtained by a greater investment of (scarce) expertise by the attacker.

Such attacks can be deterred quite simply by using secure (non-default) configuration, system patching and basic security defenses such as firewall and anti-virus. This explains the repeated exhortations of security pundits on “best practice” and also the rationale behind compliance standards and auditors trying to enforce basic minimum safeguards.

The 80/20 rule applies to attackers just as it does to defenders. Attackers are trying to cover 80% of the ground at 20% of the cost so as to at-least identify soft high value targets and at most steal from them. Defenders are trying to deter 80% of the attackers at 20% of cost by using basic best practices.

Guidance such as SANS Critical Controls or lessons from Verizon’s Annual Data Breach studies can help you prioritize your actions. Attackers depend on the fact that the majority of users do not follow basic security hygiene, don’t collect logs which would expose the attackers actions and certainly never actually look at the logs.

Defeating a “spray and pray” attacks requires basic tooling and discipline. The easy way to so this? We call it SIEM Simplified. Drop us a shout, it beats being a victim.

Practical ways to analyze login and pre-authentication failures

Nikunj Shah, team lead of EventTracker SIEM Simplified team provides some practical tips on analyzing login and pre-authentication failures:

1) Learn and know how to identify login events and their descriptions. A great resource to find event IDs is here: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc787567(v=ws.10).aspx.

2) Identify and look into the event description. To analyze events efficiently and effectively you must analyze the event description. Within the login failure description, paying attention to the details like: failure reason, user name, logon type, workstation name and source network address are critical to your investigation and analysis. By identifying the description and knowing what to pay attention to, you will easily eliminate the noise.

When using a system like EventTracker, the display of the required fields used to showcase eliminates the noise and show you the immediate error results. EventTracker will provide a summary based on the total number of events for each failure type and user name to demonstrate the automation of your systems’ critical information.

Using IDS will help your enterprise run more efficiently and effectively with the analysis of traditional reports for the hundreds of events that happen every day. Doing this without the help of a management and a monitoring tool is nearly impossible.

Please reference here for detailed charts.

Simplify SIEM with Services

To support security, compliance and operational requirements, specific and fast answers to the 4 W questions (Who, What, When, Where) are very desirable. These requirements drive the need to Security Information Event Management (SIEM) solutions that provide detailed and one-pain-of-glass visibility into this data, which is constantly generated within your information ecosystem. This visibility and the attendant effectiveness are made possibly by centralizing the collection, analysis and storage of log and other security data from sources throughout the enterprise network.

To obtain value from your SIEM solution, it must be watered and fed. This is an eternal commitment, whether your team chooses to do-it yourself or get someone to do it for you. This new white paper from EventTracker examines the pros and cons of using a specialist external service provider.

“Think about this for a second: a lot more people will engage professional services to help them RUN, not just DEPLOY, a SIEM. However, this is not the same as managed services, as those organization will continue to own their SIEM tools.” –Anton Chuvakin, Gartner Analyst

Top 5 bad assumptions about SIEM

The cliché goes “When you assume, you make an ass out of u and me.” When implementing a SIEM solution, these five assumptions have the potential to get us in trouble. They stand in the way or organization and personal success and thus are best avoided.

5. Security by obscurity or my network is too unimportant to be attacked
Small businesses tend to be more innovative and cost-conscious. Is there such a thing as too small for hackers to care? In this blog post we outlined why this is almost never the case. As the Verizon Data Breach shows year in and year out, companies with 11-100 employees from 36 countries had the maximum number of breaches.

4. I’ve got to do it myself to get it right
Charles De Gaulle on humility “The graveyards are full of indispensable men”. Everyone tries to demonstrate multifaceted skill but its neither effective nor efficient. Corporations do it all the time. Tom Friedman explains it in “The World is Flat.”

3. Compliance = Security
This is only true if your auditor is your only threat actor. We tend to fear the known more than the unknown so it is often the case that we fear the (known) auditor more than we fear the (unknown) attacker. Among the myriad lessons from the Target breach, perhaps the most important is that “Compliance” does NOT equal Security.

2. All I have to do it plug it in, the rest happens by magic
Marketing departments of every security vendor would have you believe this of their magic appliance or software. When has this ever been true? Self-propelling lawn mower anyone?

1. It’s all about buying the most expen$ive technology
Kivas Fajo in “The Most Toys” the 70th episode of Star Trek TNG believed this. You could negotiate a 90% discount on a $200K solution and then park it as shelfware, what did you get? Wasted $20K is what. It’s always about using what you have.

Bad assumptions = bad decisions.
Always true.